U.S. Lifts International Travel Ban

The U.S. lifted travel restrictions this week on a long list of countries including Mexico, Canada and most of Europe, after more than a year and a half due to the pandemic.

Starting Nov. 8, the United States began admitting fully vaccinated foreign travelers at airports and land borders from the 26 so-called Schengen countries in Europe, including France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Switzerland and Greece, as well as Britain, Ireland, China, India, South Africa, Iran and Brazil.

The new rules allow air travel from previously restricted countries as long as the traveler has proof of vaccination and a negative COVID-19 test. Land travel from Mexico and Canada will require proof of vaccination but no negative test.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the U.S. will accept travelers who have been fully vaccinated with any of the vaccines approved for emergency use by the World Health Organization, not just those in use in the U.S. That means that the AstraZeneca vaccine, widely used in Canada, will be accepted.

The new rules do not require foreign visitors or Americans entering the country to go into quarantine.

Americans traveling overseas must still show proof of a recent negative COVID-19 test, and unvaccinated Americans may face stricter testing requirements. Americans will also be subject to restrictions in countries they plan to visit, which may include quarantines.

The moves come as the U.S. has seen its COVID-19 outlook improve dramatically in recent weeks since the summer delta surge.

On Aug. 9 Canada began allowing fully vaccinated U.S. visitors for non-essential travel.


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